After eight hours of playing Asgard’s Wrath 2, here are our impressions


After eight hours of playing Asgard's Wrath 2, here are our impressions

Image: Meta

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Asgard’s Wrath 2 is a very expansive VR role-playing game. But is it good enough to justify full price? Here are our impressions after eight hours of gameplay.

Due to the size of Asgard’s Wrath 2 and the limited testing time, we have decided not to publish a review of Asgard’s Wrath 2 for now. We need much more time for a proper review than the embargoes and testing periods allow.

However, I would like to share my impressions of the first eight hours with you. This will give you an idea of whether or not this VR game is for you.

Asgard’s Wrath 2: Story, Graphics & Gameplay

  • Asgard’s Wrath 2 is a complete VR RPG unlike anything you have ever seen natively for VR — and certainly not for mobile VR headsets.
  • The story is well told and visually conveyed (despite the graphical compromises).
  • It’s impressive to see such a large VR game run so smoothly on the Quest platform (except for a few stutters).
  • Asgard’s Wrath 2 is not optimized for Quest 3 and was designed for Quest 2. Quest 3 optimizations will follow later. I find this particularly unfortunate because once again it is no reason to buy a Quest 3.
  • Graphically, the game doesn’t come close to Assassin’s Creed Nexus. It has many visual strengths, but also many flat, muddy textures. Assassin’s Creed Nexus also has the latter, but it disguises them much better.
  • The large world is particularly impressive, even if much of it was bought by the simplicity of the desert.
  • The God’s Eye view (bird’s-eye view on a table-top world) in some areas is as great as in the first game. The puzzles are not too hard.
  • Characters and animations are well done and especially the cutscenes, which you fly through instead of just looking at them in 2D, are a great way to tell stories.
  • Interactions and combat are for the most part perfectly executed, intuitive and often very satisfying, such as throwing swords and axes. Climbing is also implemented in a rather arcade-like manner, which is especially helpful in the large levels. In addition, shortcuts can be unlocked at any time.
  • However, fights against several enemies are typically hectic, despite better melee combat techniques than in Assassin’s Creed Nexus. Against single opponents, however, they unfold their thrilling effect because there is enough time for action and reaction.
A whiplash first-person perspective on a giant crustacean.

Battles against imposing crustaceans are among the random encounters in Asgard’s Wrath 2. | Bild: Meta

  • Special abilities of weapons or combos have to be memorized — but in my opinion, this is too complex for VR. Simple and intuitive moves are perfect. But if I have to pull my shield off my back, hurl it between enemies, and then use a special ability to apply the sword to the shield, I’m out. This is hardly useful in the hectic pace of combat.
  • The many consumables, from healing to totemic buffs, are of little use. The belt with the quick slots is opened by holding down the left analog stick, then I have to aim, grab the right item, and then use it. This is far too cumbersome.
  • The companions are great.
  • There are countless collectibles, from treasures to weapon and armor upgrades to plants that can be traded to merchants for items such as healing potions.
  • The manual collection of loot and the gathering of herbs, mushrooms, etc. can be quite tedious in the long run.
  • Exploring is worthwhile — there are caves, treasures, and secrets everywhere.
  • The skill tree is extensive, but not overwhelming.
  • The endless dungeon “The Uncharted Rifts” is a cool change of pace and quite motivating with its rogue-lite concept and leaderboards.
  • There are several comfort settings for people with motion sickness.
  • Unfortunately, Sanzaru Games has no sympathy for people with phobias: anyone who hates snakes and spiders or similar creatures (like me) could experience various unpleasant moments.

Asgard’s Wrath 2: Conclusion after eight hours of gameplay

My recommendation: If you’re looking for a long, motivating VR RPG that plays really well and smoothly, this is a game for you. The story and gameplay also promise a lot of fun later on, and it is simply a gigantic game.

However, bugs and performance issues may appear later in the game. The 15-hour playtime limit for reviewers indicates that not everything has been completed or optimized in the later stages of the game.

Anyone expecting a graphically polished version of Quest 3 will be disappointed. I can’t really understand that, even though there are a lot more Quest 2 headsets out there. Still, I would have expected a Quest 3 optimized version at release, especially since the game comes bundled with Quest 3.

The bottom line is that Asgard’s Wrath 3 is a really great and very comprehensive RPG experience for the first eight hours, with various visual strengths and largely polished, arcade-style gameplay. Without knowing the rest of the game, I’m going to go out on a limb and give a general recommendation.

Asgard’s Wrath is a lot of fun and motivates you to keep playing.

You can buy Asgard’s Wrath here:

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